Month: March 2012

Vibrating Tattoos Could Function as Ringtones

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ccording to the patent application, Nokia is proposing “a material attachable to skin, the material capable of detecting a magnetic field and transferring a perceivable stimulus to the skin, wherein the perceivable stimulus relates to the magnetic field.”


The idea is that the magnetic field would interact with the tattoo and could be employed as a ringtone of sorts — vibrating during incoming calls, when a text message is received or when the battery is running low. The Journal also notes that the patent application could manifest in a badge. Either way, the idea is to embed the phone on a person.

Such a technology has its perks: You’ll never miss another call, and people won’t have to listen to your obnoxious ringtone anymore.MORE

Image: bgrimmni/Creative Commons

Multi-word passphrases not all that secure, says Cambridge University

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Cambridge UniversityThink that a passphrase of multiple, random dictionary words is as unguessable as long strings of gibberish, but easier to remember?

Research from the Computer Laboratory at the University of Cambridge suggests that this might not be so.

While passphrases using dictionary words may not be as vulnerable as individual passwords, they may still be cracked by dictionary attacks, the research found.

Security researcher Joseph Bonneau reports, in a recent paper written with Ekaterina Shutova, that his team studied the problem by turning not to the theoretical space of choices but rather the real-life passphrases that people actually string together.

To find such a selection of passphrases, his team used data crawled from the now-defunct Amazon PayPhrase system, introduced last year for US users only.

The goal wasn’t to evaluate the security of the scheme as deployed by Amazon, Bonneau says, but rather to learn more about how people choose passphrases in general.

Amazon’s was “a relatively limited data source”, he writes, but the research results do “suggest some caution on this approach”.

In the original version of the Amazon site, passphrases had to be at least two words long. Error messages indicated when a passphrase was already in use.MORE

Cyberwar: hype or reality?

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Filed Under: Featured, Law & order, Malware

keyboard_grenadeInternet security is a hot political topic at the moment. Governments are instrumenting changes to protect key infrastructure from both foreign and domestic network attacks.

Only last week, the White House simulated an internet attack on New York’s power grid to highlight risks and garner support for their bill called S. 2105: Cybersecurity Act of 2012.

During the UK Prime Minister’s visit to the US last week, both David Cameron and Barack Obama pledged a closer partnership on internet security issues. A joint fact sheet, released on March 14 last week, states:

As the United States and the United Kingdom continue developing joint capabilities that support our national security interests in cyberspace, we are sharing more and more incident data to help us and our allies counter advanced persistent threats.

obama-cameron-picture_from_CNN

Against the backdrop of wider internet security discussions, concerns about cyberwarfare often arise. However, thanks to liberal use of the term, and a big dollop of hype, it is very difficult to work out what cyberwar actually encompasses.more

Is the art of computer viruses dead?

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Stop press! The art of computer viruses may not be dead, after all.

Vancouver-based artist Bratsa Bonifacho says his latest collection of paintings has been inspired by computer malware.

One of Bonifacho’s virus paintings is titled “Horty MyParty is Weird and Coolnow”.

An unusual name, you might think, but it is apparently inspired by a number of viruses from yesteryear including VBS/Horty (which claimed to offer pornographic content of adult film star Jenna Jameson), 2002’s MyParty email worm, and the CoolNow MSN Messenger worm.

MORE

Corrupt call center workers selling your private information for pennies

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Thief with secrets image courtesy of ShutterstockAccording to the Daily Mail an undercover investigation in India has uncovered that some call center workers have been selling confidential information on nearly 500,000 Britons.

Undercover reporters from The Sunday Times met with two individuals who claimed to be IT workers who offered to provide them with 45 different types of data gathered from the victims.

Information offered up included names, addresses, phone numbers and credit card details (including CCV/CVV codes and expiration dates).

The reporters allege they could purchase the records for as little as 2 pence apiece ($0.03 USD). One of the IT workersthieves bragged:

"These [pieces of data] are ones that have been sold to somebody already. This is Barclays, this is Halifax, this is Lloyds TSB. We’ve been dealing so long we can tell the bank by just the card number."more

Neta Chor Vayo Vane (Part 1)

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“Neta Chor Vayo Vane . . .”

Warning : “This Video is not for Violation and Illegal sharing is not allowed”

Link to Video : http://youtu.be/v9zxK3QUPN0

‘YOUr COMMENTS’ (PART 1)
Creator : Bijay Acharya (DEADBJ)

Story : “Facebook Screen Captured Video, where people posted their views via their comments. Status and Comments in the account is about current situation of Nepal and people reacting to it.’

Points to be captured :
“Government is not the solution to our problem”

“New Nepal getting worse incomparision to OLD”

“Stop punishing Smokers. Start to destroy Cigarette Factory”

“Stop Beating Driver after Accident,you are not the judge or police. Rather be fast and call Police.Till the arrival of police,control the vehicle,driver and situation. That’s the true Courage.That’s the True Humanity”
Warning : “This Video is not for Violation and Illegal sharing is not allowed”

Editor/Admin (of Account) :
Bijay Acharya (DEADBJ)

“Presentation By “DEADBJ QUOTES” :)

How Anonymous spied on FBI / UK Police hacking investigation conference call

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http://sophosnews.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/conference-call-spy-170.jpg” alt=”Conference call spy image from Shutterstock” align=”right” hspace=”10″ vspace=”10″ />

Conference call spy image from ShutterstockLast month, we reported how a conference call, between the FBI and Scotland Yard, discussing their investigation into Anonymous hackers had been secretly recorded by the hacking collective and published on the net.

We surmised at the time that the unknown hackers might have secretly accessed the call by compromising a police investigator’s email account, as the call-in details and passcode were posted by Anonymous on their usual dumping ground – the PasteBin website.

http://sophosnews.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/fbi-email1.jpg” alt=”Conference call email, republished by Anonymous” />

Conference call email, republished by AnonymousYesterday’s announcement by the FBI about the prominent LulzSec hacker Sabu, and other alleged hacktivists, has revealed more details about what actually happened.

According to an FBI press release, a Garda (Irish police) officer who was invited to attend the conference call about ongoing hacking investigations forwarded the message to a personal email account.

Unfortunately, that personal email account was compromised by a hacker.MORE